From early in the 19th century, puppetry began to inspire artists from the ‘high-art’ traditions. In 1810, Heinrich von Kleist wrote an essay ‘On the Marionette Theatre’, admiring the “lack of self-consciousness” of the puppet. Puppetry developed throughout the 20th century in a variety of ways. Supported by the parallel development of cinema, television and other filmed media it now reaches a larger audience than ever. Another development, starting at the beginning of the century, was the belief that puppet theatre, despite its popular and folk roots, could speak to adult audiences with an adult, and experimental voice, and reinvigorate the high art tradition of actors’ theatre.[40]